Naturist Podcast Ep. 1 // Everything You Wanted To Know About Being A Naturist But Were Afraid To Ask

Naturism, for me, is where environmentalism, social nudism, and feminism collide
Mandy Zelinka
Skinny Dippers Club

The idea of a Naturist Field Guide came to us when Jeremy found his old Boy Scout book. What we realized is that the naturist community as a whole could probably benefit from a guide book – especially for people thinking about getting into naturism. Then that turned into a podcast and then launching a non-profit. The non-profit – Global Naturist Alliance – has a social justice arm to it that we just haven’t seen on a large scale globally with naturist organizations and we really think the naturist movement simply cannot progress without it.

We will be looking for board members from all over the world representing different countries. The goal is to not only collect data from our communities and create a Global Field Guide to Naturism but to also set the mission, vision, and values of the Naturist movement worldwide.

Without a vision, a movement has no gas.

Naturism, for me, is where environmentalism, social nudism, and feminism collide. You’ll see that reflected in this podcast. I hope you enjoy it!

Mandy Z.

Skinny Dippers Club
Mandy@SkinnyDippers.Club 

 

ep. Everything you wanted to know about being a naturist but were afraid to ask

Show Notes

Maybe I’m a naturist and I don’t know it

Hey guys, it’s Mandy Z 

 

and I’m Jeremy. 

 

Speaker 1:

And this is episode one of the naturist podcast where we’re going to talk about everything you wanted to know about being a naturist, but we’re too afraid to ask. I admit I’m much more of a clothing-optional gal, Jeremy, on the other hand is much more of a naturist. 

 

So what do all of these labels mean? They tend to matter when you’re trying to choose how you want to spend your time naked. I am down with all shades of nudism, but for me, I have found that clothing-optional places tend to usually have more of “my” people. They have more women, more progressive views and a much more laid back label-free atmosphere. It’s kind of the naturist definition of “can’t we all just get along.” Plus I’m a creative gal. So I have an appreciation for beautifully designed caftans by the pool. I mean, let’s be honest. What I don’t enjoy is having to put pants on. Even if my ass does look fine at them. Oh, I did write that didn’t I?

 

Jeremy is a forever Boy Scout. So last summer when he was able to be in the woods with me and show me how to track barefoot prints or whatever you call them. He was thrilled animal tracking. I was mostly upset that I got so much mud on my boots, but I do enjoy a pantsless hike.

 

Speaker 2:

They were designer boots. So I understand,

 

Speaker 1:

Oh, maybe I’m a nudist and I don’t know it. Oh, what do you think about that, Jeremy?

 

Speaker 2:

Well, it’s kind of how it started for me. Tell me more. 

 

Speaker 1:

I was listening in on this webinar and what I keep hearing from the global naturist community is that only in the States do they call it “nudist” and most the rest of the world finds that the word nudist actually means exhibitionist to them. Which actually sounds correct. If you’ve been part of the nudist community in the United States, that is why we are trying to change all of our verbiages because nothing against exhibitionists. I mean, if you’re running around naked, there’s gotta be part of you that doesn’t mind being on display, but that’s not the point. The point is that we’re talking about naturalism and that to me, I don’t know what it is to you, but for me, natural naturalism is where environmentalism, social nudism and feminism collide. So no part of that says exhibitionist or, or that, you know, shade of nudism. Right. So what does naturism mean to you?

 

Speaker 2:

Well, it’s interesting that you interjected the piece of feminism – where feminism, social nudism and environmentalism collide, because I didn’t realize that I was a feminist until you and I started seeing each other. So I actually agree with your definition. I don’t, I don’t know that I would have put the three things together like that before, but I am happiest when it can be without pants on outdoors. I’m usually drawn to outdoor settings to places that aren’t in a, in a resort, although we like to go to resorts too from time to time. But for the most part, I like kind of going back to my youth. Yeah. My Boy Scout – I like doing things just out, out and about outdoors naked.

 

Speaker 1:

You told me that when you were in Boy Scouts as a kid, that part of the appeal of boy Scouts is that you guys got to run around naked.

 

Speaker 2:

Well, it wasn’t like we got to run around naked all the time. It wasn’t like we did organized naked events, but there was a lot of times that you know, we we’d shower together and it would be, it wasn’t uncommon to be naked because we were just hanging out together as a boy scout troop, or we’d go skinny dipping in the middle of the night, or, you know, if you’re wanting to be in the boy Scouts, or if you wanted to run around in the campsite in your underwear, nobody really cared because it, you were just a bunch of kids hanging out and

 

Speaker 1:

at some point having raised boys, you, you just want to take them outside and hose them off sometimes. So I, Ethan ran around naked in our backyard all the time because he just, he was just,

 

Speaker 2:

You just did it. But as a kid just running around, out in the outdoors, it was great to just run around feeling like I was streaking. I mean, yeah, exactly. Just like that.

 

Speaker 1:

You know, that’s one of the first things that I noticed when I finally was like, it, I’m taking my clothes off and getting this pool. Cause you guys are all having a blast and I’m sitting here with my book and my glasses. And so the best part, I think every, but it’s been two summers now that I’ve been doing this just laying out naked or, you know, hiking, whatever, but being naked and feeling the sun, but also feeling like the breeze hit you and your parts – parts of you that never get the sun or a breeze on them. Oh, it’s just so liberating.

 

Speaker 2:

It is. I think the best part about being a naturist or as far as an activity is being in the water nude. Because I, I,

 

Speaker 1:

Yeah, without, I mean, I like wearing swim suits, don’t get me wrong, but that’s just cause I love fashion. But yeah. Being in the pool, hot tub, soaking tub, no clothes. Oh, that’s where it’s at, man.

 

Speaker 2:

I particularly like a really warm, a really warm pool. We went to one place that had a super warm pool and I felt weightless. And I, it just felt like the, the water was an extension of my body and it was phenomenal.

Health Benefits of being a naturist or nudist

Happiness.com article: http://ow.ly/JBE030o3Rqr

Article from VISE: What Nudists Taught Me About Body Positivity

https://www.vice.com/en/article/negyxd/how-to-be-body-positive-naked?platform=hootsuite

 

Mental HealthThe sensation of being Naked

Being Naked Can Make You A Healthier, More Confident Person. 

Perhaps time spent naked is the form of self-care we’re missing 👇🏼

https://www.mindbodygreen.com/articles/being-naked-is-good-for-your-health?platform=hootsuite

 

Nat Geo: We Are Wired To Be Outside https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2017/02/nature-fix-brain-happy-florence-williams/

 

 

So I mean, that brings us to the health benefits of being a naturist, right? If you’re unhappy with your physical form, it could hinder your wellbeing obviously. And some studies suggest that getting naked among strangers might boost your positive body image. So this is an actual article from happiness.com and you know, the first paragraph, a body, excuse me, a positive body image it, blah,

 

Speaker 2:

Let me read it.  A positive body image is a strong factor in determining a person’s happiness. If you’re unhappy with your physical shape, it can hinder your wellbeing. Interestingly studies suggest that practicing nudism –  a lifestyle of being naked – can boost positive feelings about your body and self. I had replaced new nudism with naturalism, but

 

Speaker 1:

So they’re really just saying a bunch of stuff that every person that practices naturism, nudism, wherever you live and call it already knows. And it’s, it’s interesting that once you take your clothes off around strangers, that your body positivity could shoot up. But the interesting thing about that, that you don’t find out until you actually go to someplace where people take their clothes off, is that what you end up finding is that nobody has this perfect body, that the media has been trying to sell you all these years. I mean,

 

Speaker 2:

All those TV shows where it’s like Baywatch or whatever that doesn’t actually happen in the real world. You don’t see the perfect bodies running around on nude beaches and stuff all the time. What we’ve actually found is, is

 

Speaker 1:

More interesting bodies, like a woman with two tattoos on each of her buttocks. Yeah. Wouldn’t have ever seen that.

 

Speaker 2:

Well I think you’d have, you would see that, but you’d, I think you’d have to explain a little bit more in detail. The woman was of a certain age that we weren’t expecting. Okay.

 

Speaker 1:

Let me tell the whole story. So we’re down at the pool and I’m very new to this way of “running around naked.” So I’m, everything’s like big open eyes. Oh my God. Oh my God. Oh my God. What, they said what, what they did what? Right. Because I mean, for a while there, it just felt like we were living in an SNL skit. So, but that’s honestly what happens if you go visit an actual nudist park in the States, it’s like an SNL skit

 

Speaker 2:

More about that later. Yeah.

 

Speaker 1:

Anyhow, so I’m at the pool and I don’t realize that there’s an entire family down there. I just see an older woman in her eighties with butt tattoos. It’s the same tattoo on each cheek and Jeremy comes over and I’m like, man, I bet her grandkids don’t know she has those tattoos. Cause I was like, what a bad ass! Jeremy’s like “her grandson’s right there.” I was like, “Oh, well, okay.” And I thought that was cool as hell was very cool.

 

Speaker 2:

Grandma.

 

Speaker 1:

So yeah, I think the, you know, getting back to the body positivity thing, it’s really just, once you find out that nobody has that body that you’ve been trying to, that media has been trying to sell you your entire life. You start looking at yourself differently. I did. I was like, I’m pretty great too. I, my entire life, I just thought my breasts were like big and obnoxious and in my way, and a lot of that probably is because I played sports as a kid. And at one point I couldn’t even like golf. So yeah. I mean, your body positivity ended up translating into losing weight. Did it not?

 

Speaker 2:

Well, it was a wow, it’s kind of a long story. I’ll see if I can boil some of this down. So when, when we moved up to Seattle several years ago moved up here and got a different job, kind of redefined our lives. And a few years ago I decided I wanted to try to be a naturist at the time I wasn’t sure exactly what I was trying to accomplish, but found a group of guys that went around as a traveling club and went to different places, a nude beach a nudist club, a nudist park a spa and steam room. And we just traveled around in different places. And it was really cool because there was one group that had a kind of a spinoff group and they called it it was a group of guys that were all bigger. It was a bears bears group and we’d do these swimming parties. And it was so cool too, to just go and hang out with other, other thick guys, like really just own their thickness. And I had never owned my thickness because I always considered myself overly thick or extra chunky. And I didn’t realize that.

 

I just didn’t realize that. I’m just like a bunch of other thick guys and there’s other guys out there. So yeah,

 

Speaker 1:

I have had the opportunity to be more body positive being in bigger bodies because there’s so many women with the body positivity movement on, you know, online, but a lot on Instagram and we’re very visual creatures. So, you know, I don’t, I don’t think there’s as much of that for men, but like you and another member in our community, who’s a bigger guy. You guys get really stoked when you see other, you know, bears or thick dude’s like just representing

 

Speaker 2:

Big boys. Yeah. Now, you know, it’s interesting. I, I didn’t really realize that there is a bit of a movement out there to increase body acceptance and build body positivity for bigger guys, but it is more common in that theme for women than men. And I didn’t realize how much men shame other men for, for their bodies. So it has been really nice to find other thick guys to hang out with and feel more comfortable in my skin because I did lose some weight. I think a lot of that was attributed to our, our healthier lifestyle of, of being out and hiking and being engaged and being out in the outdoors and not, not running up to the pizza place every other night, because we lived in a city community where we could just walk to the pizza place or the bar or whatever. Yeah. Oh man. I remember the banana splits anyway yeah, we’re not doing that. So I’m like,



Speaker 1:

So there’s this article in vice, which I, it must be from the States because it, it calls it nudists. So what nudism taught me about my body positivity, Barbie Pharaoh speaks to a body painter and visits a naturist colony in the nude to see how different people practice body acceptance. And so when she goes to the, it sounds like her last stop was at the rock lodge club where she met the young naturist of America at body positive nudist community. But Barbie doesn’t just want to visit them. Instead. She spends an entire day in the nude, amongst the community to see what their lifestyles really about Felicity Jones. Do you think that’s really her name?

 

Speaker 2:

I don’t know. I like the name.

 

Speaker 1:

Okay. Felicity Jones, a member of young naturists of America shows Barbie around and explains that body acceptance is one of the main reasons. People are drawn to naturism. They come and they try it and they’re like, wow, nobody’s looking at me. She says, Barbie joins the group. And they make a campfire. Sounds like our place. They make a camp fire, complete with a body positivity exercise, probably yoga. They paint on each other. And of course, skinny dip. That’s the best part by the end of her visit Barbie learns that it’s possible to cultivate a safe space for our bodies when we’re not so preoccupied with who is looking at them and what they’re thinking. Coming to Rock Lodge I’ve learned that people tend to judge each other on their bodies, their clothing, the way they speak, but here it’s a designated safe space. She says the missions of naturists are pretty much everything. I’m about body positivity. Anti-Censorship a good self body image. Being here can feel whole because you’re more than just your body here, a person. Oh my God. That’s so true. How many times have we been in the hot tub with people? We have no clue who they are and you get into this deep discussion about whatever, and it’s never about work. Nobody ever talks about work

Nobody ever talks about work

...ya know now that we're talking about being in a hot tub naked with people you've never met because it happens a lot where I live...
Mandy Zelinka
Skinny Dippers Club

Speaker 2:

That’s the, I think that’s the best part.

 

Speaker 1:

Do you think that people just get like, so out of their head that they’re able to relax enough, that they can actually put work to the side.

 

Speaker 2:

You know, I, I think so because when you’re in a setting where everybody is nude or naked and you’ve got your cell phones put away, you’re typically in a hot tub or a pool or something. So it’s not like you can have your cell phone anyway, or your, or a book or anything. It’s just you and the people that you’re surrounded by. And one of the reasons you’re probably doing it is because you’re trying to escape the daily rigors of life. So one of the last things you’re going to probably talk about is work well, at least that’s, that’s the way it is for me. I don’t want to talk about work when I’m hanging out naked. 

 

Speaker 1:

You know now that we’re talking about being in a hot tub naked with people you’ve never met because it happens a lot where I live. I’ve been to college. It wasn’t for very long, but I was there long enough to know what college can feel like for a young woman, surrounded by nothing but big burly men in a hot tub. It could be a scary experience, right. Even with a swimsuit on. So I, you know, I was in this hot tub with like seven dudes. Were were all naked and it was actually the safest I have ever felt around that many men. And I was cracking up as I was realizing like, this is insane. How, how is this possible?

 

Speaker 2:

Well, it, you know, it’s, it’s interesting because the settings that we’ve typically found ourselves in most of the people are pretty respectful. And actually by and large, most people that we’ve encountered in, in this naturist lifestyle, they’re, they’re pretty respectful. There’s a few on the, on the fringes, which we will get to at some point. But but it’s, it’s really kind of a cool community of people that just like to strip down and, and, and unwind and relax in most of the settings where we’ve had, you know hot tub time or, or hot Springs time or whatever.

 

Speaker 1:

So we are partnered with SSI, which is the social safety initiative. And Jeremy is president of the board

 

Speaker 2:

President of the board for the social safety initiative, which is a nonprofit that provides education training and safety gear to community organizations and businesses to help people prepare and reopen their business safely during an epidemic or a pandemic or other odd event. So we’re specifically focused on, on COVID 19 protocols. Oh, but vitamin D as well.

 

Speaker 1:

So, so with your work with them, you found out a bunch of things this summer that really brought out some of the health benefits of being a naturist. And one of those was not only the consumption of vitamin D, which has helped healthy for your skin. Cause I think most people know you need vitamin D, but I believe it was not only the head to toe vitamin D because you get head to toe vitamin D without clothes. And then the other thing was sun killing viruses, which kills COVID. So naturists actually are probably more immune to COVID.

 

Speaker 2:

It’s a healthier lifestyle definitely for during the pandemic. So for three reasons for a naturist: ventilation, UV rays and vitamin D. So a lot of the things that we talk about with social safety initiative is viral load, and that’s basically the concentration, the amount of virus on a surface or in your breath cloud, or in the area that you’re in. And if you’re out in the open air, then there’s a lower concentration of the virus. So you’re already a step ahead of people who only hang out in doors or in gyms or whatever. The next thing that’s super helpful for naturalists in fighting COVID-19 are actually, there’s a number of other viruses too, is exposure to UV rays. Now that’s a fine line because we’ve been raised that they can be bad if you expose yourself too much, but the COVID-19 virus dies with exposure to those UV rays. So even just being outside and getting that head to toe UV killed by those rays. And then the third thing that’s beneficial is vitamin D. You don’t get vitamin D straight from sunlight, but sunlight hitting your skin, converts cholesterol into vitamin D. So if you’re outside and you are exposing yourself safely to small amounts of sunlight, then you are reducing your cholesterol when your body naturally without oatmeal, which is kind of cool. Cholesterol becomes vitamin D and vitamin D helps beef up the, the immune system in your, in your cells to fight off the crop

 

Speaker 1:

Well, you even suggested if you’re at work and see the sun run out in it. Right?

 

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah. Yeah. In fact, if you can, if you can get yourself in a, if you’re working from home or working from an office, wherever it is that you work, get yourself set up so that you can be close to the sunshine side of an office. If you’re in an office space with windows because even the air that is passing through the area of your office, that’s close to a window, it helps kill the virus. So get some ventilation, get some sunlight. Those are two key things that help fight the virus.

 

Speaker 1:

It’s so funny. So we live in a community – an intentional living community. That’s, it’s a nudist colony, if you ask me. But so there’s about 40 of us here, and there’s some really elderly people that live here. And, you know, when the pandemic first hit, I was like, Oh, they have a lot of elderly people here. Like we not a nursing home, but what’s the step before that convalescent center. Yeah. So it’s hilarious though, because these are the same people that turn into prunes in the summer, you know, like I called them Dooney and Bourke and coach bags, because they’re so pruned up from like any time the sun comes out, they run down and just lay out in the sun. They’re fine. Yeah. They’re still ticking.

 

Speaker 2:

Yep. They seem to be the most

 

Speaker 2:

Being out in the fresh air is super helpful.

 

Speaker 1:

Well, and anytime that I am able to, so I, in a way I’m fortunate to work from home because I work from a place that I literally don’t have to wear pants – it’s encouraged, but Oh God, it’s so nice to just do a couple loop, couple loops around the trailer park as a break, because I just take these deep breaths of, of mountain air and you know what little sun there is out, I try to get it, but, Oh my God. Yeah. I just try to deep breathe like all the way around in circles. Just like trying to breathe it all in. 

 

So according to National Geographic, we are wired to be outside. Science is demonstrating what we intuitively know about nature. It makes us happy. Oh my God, isn’t that going to basically be one of our taglines?

 

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Well, you know what? I just had a flashback to Boy Scouts. So one of my scout masters, I had several scout masters when I was a youth in the Scouts, but one of them was, he was an optometrist and he used to talk about how beneficial it was to give our eyes a rest and the best, one of the best ways to rest your eyes is to be out in nature and look at things far away, like a mountain. We’re up here near Seattle and Mount Rainier is often the distance. And I find myself when I go for walks at work I actually have a view. And when I’m out walking at work and I will pause for a little bit, and I will look at, at Mount Rainier, which is like 60 miles in the distance, but I feel so much better in my eyes. I Feel relieved when I can look at something way off in the distance. You don’t get that opportunity when you don’t get out of your apartment or you don’t get out of the busy bustling streets of a city.

One of the best ways to rest your eyes is to be out in nature and look at things far away, like a mountain.
Jeremy

The part of our brain that’s hyper engaged in modern life deactivates a little when you’re outside.

Speaker 1:

Fascinating. Yeah. So this dude in the UK, who is a happiness researcher, and his name is George McCarran is doing this research on basically like what makes people happy? So one of the things he found out at the end of it, shockingly, is that people aren’t happy when they’re at work. They’re happiest when they’re on vacations with friends, making our listening to music. One of the surprising finds was that they’re also very, very happy when they’re outside. Another interesting anecdote from the national geographic article is that the frontal lobe, the part of our brain that’s hyper engaged in modern life deactivates a little when you’re outside. So that actually just falls right in line with what we were talking about, how nobody talks about work when they’re at a naturist place or they’re outside naked, or, you know, hanging out with friends without clothes on.

 

Speaker 2:

And the thing that I have found to be the best about being a naturist, besides all of the, getting back to my boy scouting roots and feeling like a kid is that as a, as a suffer of post-traumatic stress syndrome, I have found a way to not only disconnect, but also start to heal. And I didn’t really notice that that was one of the reasons why I was so hooked on naturalism at first, until I started finding other people on Instagram who were also pantless wonders and talked about the tie between going to a Hot Springs or Hiking Nude, or becoming more one with nature and disconnecting enough to start the, the restorative process to become whole again, because sometimes when I’ve had PTSD symptoms, I don’t feel whole. And yeah. So, it’s been really cool. A couple of things. One is just feeling like I’m healing myself into finding a community of other individuals who have had traumatic experiences and connecting with them and finding ways that we can celebrate survivorship together. 

Mandy

That’s deep, dude. 

 

Jeremy

Thanks. I didn’t mean to go quite that deep, so fast, but that was the most succinct I’ve ever been able to describe how I feel about PTSD and being a naturist.

 

Mandy

I want to talk about something really interesting that happened while Jeremy, how would you explain what went on this summer with you?

 

Speaker 2:

I would either call it a partial PTSD relapse, or most people would call it a mental health breakdown.

 

Speaker 1:

That was a breakdown, although I don’t always choose my words correctly. So, so we had quite a summer. And part of that was actually due to the fact that he thought he was going to get fired for living at a nudist park and being a naturist. His boss did not like that. He ran around naked in the nudist colony with other people. And you know what? People have all sorts of assumptions about what people do without their clothes on. And a lot of them are wrong and a lot of them are right and it’s wrong or right. Depending on what situation you’re looking at.

 

Speaker 1:

So, I mean, in some ways he’s right, in some ways he’s wrong. So it was, it was a very scary summer besides the fact that the pandemic was happening. But you actually started seeing a therapist and our relationship has never been a problem. But I mean, I, if you have a relationship and you went through the pandemic and you didn’t think somebody needed to go see a therapist, then man, you can love your partner to death, but whew, everybody’s trapped together. So Jeremy started seeing, she has a lovely name, Sabina once a week. And so he actually ended up stopping, talking about work so much at home, which reduced my anxiety. And so it’s been better because it’s not easy right now, especially when we live in, how many square feet, 250. What is that in meters? It’s small, but so Sabina wanted you to journal. And I encouraged you because you are, he’s always like, I’m not a writer. And I think he is, he just has to write so many legal documents at work all week. He’s basically writing lawyer stuff that I think he’s just burnt out from.

 

Speaker 2:

I don’t see it as lawyer stuff. She always thinks about the work that I do as lawyer stuff I work in, in government work. So it’s just like

 

Speaker 1:

Legal stuff. Yeah. You’d have anxiety too. Anyhow. So I actually encourage you. We hadn’t been posting photos on our Instagram feed. So I actually encouraged him to, instead of journaling to set an alarm clock every night and 9:00 PM post a photo on our Instagram feed and just talk about what he was going through and what that meant to him in regards to being a naturist.

 

Speaker 2:

Well, as you know, I’m not doing it anymore, but at the time that we started doing it, it was a great outlet for me. In fact at first I don’t think that you, you thought I was really going to be into it and then know, and I ended up doing it with actually just about every single night I was doing it. And it wasn’t until actually just a few weeks ago that things kind of dwindled off because we shifted gears a little bit, but it was a great opportunity for me. We do a lot of photo shoots and they’re kind of like sometimes they’re impromptu, sometimes they’re intentional. And we tried it.

 

Speaker 1:

I just try to have as much fun as we can in any time, anywhere we’re at. I mean, I was doing the running man in China and then I did the sprinkler. We were making dance videos.

 

Speaker 2:

So we just like to have fun. It was,  It was a great way for me to unwind at the end of the night to go back and look at some of these photos that we did and think about the fun times. And then every once in a while a photo would speak to me and say, Oh yeah, remember that time that we did whatever. And today I happen to have a situation that was tied into that theme. So I’d post that photo and then talk about the theme or talk about what happened.

 

Speaker 1:

And the best part is that he was doing it with our naturist friends, because everyone that we are friends with on Instagram are our friends. We don’t follow anyone we don’t want to, and we don’t let anyone in we don’t want to. So our Instagram feed has been a word of mouth since day one, which I absolutely love because I am a word of mouth marketing girl. So people probably look at our Instagram, they’re like, Hmm, they only have 450 followers. We have 450 engaged people. We have 450 friends that like, Jeremy could be like, Hey, did you know, so-and-so’s did such and such? And I’d be like, Oh really? Like you shared some like really deep things with strangers online, but they’re not, they’re not strangers, you know,

 

Speaker 2:

I don’t consider them strangers. So there I’ve actually had some really, really deep conversations with the folks that we’ve connected with on, on Twitter or on Instagram, on our inner closed Instagram community. I mean really deep conversations, like where did you come from? Kind of like childhood,

 

Speaker 1:

Childhood trauma, PTSD, really, really, really deep levels. Yeah.

 

Speaker 2:

So it’s the type of conversations that you only have when you, you consider yourself a really good friend and these are people that. I’ve either never heard their voice or I’ve never met them in person or both. Some people I’ve heard on, on video, but I can tell you have never met. These are all virtual connections. Yeah.

 

Speaker 1:

I feel like we have all these pen pals during a pandemic. It’s the coolest thing ever. I love it. Yeah. I, I think friends at our fingertips any hour of the day,

 

Speaker 2:

And I think what’s even cooler than that is the connections that we make in our inner skinny dipper community. Because, you know, there is a level of sensor censorship on, on Instagram or any of the social media platforms, but in the platform that Mandy built, is this a boring topic for you?

 

Speaker 1:

Well, I talk about myself all day already. So

 

Speaker 2:

The platform that Mandy built for skinny dippers club is it’s amazing because folks can, can post full frontal nudes or, you know, well, I was going to say the thing that is so cool. And I think the thing that a lot of non nudists don’t think of non naturists don’t think of is that for naturist, when we do activities nude, it’s no different than people with clothes on doing those activities. So posting pictures of you doing that activity and you happen to have your, your breasts in the photo, or my penis is in the photo or whatever. It’s not a big deal because it’s just part of the activity that you’re doing. And we can, we can share those photos and talk to people inside our community. It’s a safe place to do that. And that’s what I appreciate probably the most.

 

Speaker 1:

Yeah. I mean, the thing that I was going to interject with was one – our heightened security, like I’m always, we’re always upgrading the security on the site so that people feel safe posting in there because I mean, Jeremy was almost fired last summer. I don’t want anyone to ever get fired because they’re hanging out with their friends and I am the ring leader. Oh my God. So no, I don’t want to get my friends in trouble. So we also have we have a paywall it’s, you know, it costs like a Netflix fee every month. So it’s not a lot, but you know, not only is it paying for us to do upgrades on the site, we just are adding a chat feature this weekend, which everyone’s super stoked on – me too. That it also verifies the person upon entry. So we, that was our second security measure. 

 

Because we have such good security and we have all these measures in place so that we don’t end up with creeps. And you know, back to that word of mouth thing through Instagram, like I have tried to do every possible thing I can to make sure bad people stay out like Trump flag people stay the away, get out. I have my shotgun, but it allows people to feel free in the community. I know that Jeremy loves coming home from a hard day at work and going into community and hanging out with everyone and not having to censor himself because someone might, one of his employees might find him on a social media channel or some distant aunt you hate.

 

Speaker 2:

I have found that even though I can’t get out in nature as much, if I can come back and hang out with my friends – I was saying I want to interject when I have a chance to your point about what I do when I come home and I hang out in the community, I often feel like I get some of the benefits that I normally would outside because I’m hanging out in this community of people that I would be hanging with outside.

 

Speaker 1:

Wow. Oh, but you typically are outside with them because we’re typically in the soaking tub on our devices. You’re right. But dude, if you would also like to have a euphoric experience where you’re hanging out naked with your friends, you too can join our community and build yourself a soaking tub. And we could all soak together every night. Okay. But the point I was really trying to get to is that we have two dads in our community that have been divorced or are in the middle of divorced. And they have wanted to have an online community that they can be themselves in. And they are able to do that within our community because they can’t be open about who they are on social media because of ex wives or kids or what have you. And so they really appreciate having this space to relax and rewind online? And you know what, now that I’m really high. I’m really proud of that. Like, I’m a, Oh man, I am high. We moved to Seattle five years ago and I have not made one in-person friend. I mean, I, I, I did, you know, work in an office for awhile and, but I mean, I got this dude and although I love him and he’s fun. Like he can’t be my only friend.

 

Speaker 1:

So like I have a bunch of friends and, and we hang out without pants on, it’s awesome. I’m like, why do you have pants on if you don’t have to, I’m not the crazy one here. And who likes doing laundry? The laundry bill has gone down. I don’t think we ever wash anything but the sheets and my shirts. Oh. And towels. Cause we don’t wear underwear. And I mean, I live in a nudist place, so I, I have hiking boots by the door. I literally have hiking boots, a pair of socks and my sports bra. And then I just put my winter coat on and walk my laps. So

 

Speaker 2:

That makes you sound pretty privileged actually.

 

Speaker 1:

No, I have recognized this because every time I’m like, I would like to live in a real house with real plumbing. But I’d have to put pants on to take the garbage out. Not worth it. So everything you wanted to know about being a naturist, but we’re afraid to ask, do you think we missed anything? Jerre bear.

 

Speaker 2:

I’m sure we did because I think every person, probably every person brings a different perspective to asking questions about naturalism.

 

Speaker 1:

Well, and from my market research, everybody’s idea of naturism is different. It’s really how you experienced nature without clothes on. I mean, I think at the bare, at the bare minimum.

 

Speaker 2:

So

 

Speaker 1:

I would say that really great, great gateways to naturism, I would say would be naked, yoga, hiking going anywhere. Clothing optional beach. I didn’t realize I was a nudist. But like I’ve said in my writings before, I never wanted to put clothes on as a kid really. And I’ve never cleaned the house with clothes on cause then I’d have to wash the laundry. And so I didn’t realize, you know, Jeremy got into it and I was like, no, dude, I’m not trying to be socially naked in front of anyone.

 

Speaker 2:

Oh, I remember what you said. I can’t imagine having nudist friends now, like almost a hundred percent of our friends are naturists.

 

Speaker 1:

Yeah. Yeah. So, you know, if you, if you’re listening to this and you’re like, okay, that sounds hella cool. Like how do I get into this? Try to find out if there’s some yoga online that you want to do naked in your home, maybe cooking naked is, is fun. Cooking without pants on is good. If you want to lay outside naked, if you can do that in your backyard, a lot of times you can go on a hiking trail without pants on, which is fine.

 

Speaker 2:

Awesome. You know, something else you might want to just think about, oftentimes we’re conditioned into routines. There was a naturist that I was speaking to, they said that they discovered that they were an actual naturist once they could get past the fact that the only reason why they left their bedroom with clothes on is because it was a habit. So they would walk around their bedroom completely naked, but they were conditioned from childhood through their first marriage. This was a, a guy that is now divorced, but he realized that it, it was just a habit to put on his, his briefs and his t-shirt before he walked out the bedroom door, probably because he was around his kids or, you know, whatever, you know, modesty. But but now he, that was his gateway. He just, he started going out in the living room nude and then he started cooking nude. And then he started doing laundry in the nude. And now he does everything at home in the nude. And he has connected with some other land, non landed clubs. So he can go out and enjoy events. He’s on the East coast where there’s a lot more activities in places – he lives in one of those areas as a lot of a lot of stuff. So he’s fortunate.

 

Speaker 1:

How do you wanna wrap it up, dude? So in conclusion everything you want to know about being a naturist but were too afraid to ask. We talked about clothing optional. We talked about what it is to be a naturist for each of us. We talked about health benefits, body positivity, the mental health sensation of being naked sun and fresh air. And you know, a pretty, pretty profound one that I don’t think we hear mentioned a lot when we talk about being naked in nature. And that’s the mental health side of naturism.

 

Speaker 2:

I’d love to talk about that more, not now, but future episodes.

 

Speaker 1:

So if you thought that any of this information was interesting, you can totally sign up for our blog and this podcast naturalspodcast.com.