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Naturist Podcast Ep. 5 // Our chat with Hector Martinez, Mexico Naturist Advocate

"It's still very, very much a binary subculture."
Jeremy

The idea of a Naturist Field Guide came to us when Jeremy found his old Boy Scout book. What we realized is that the naturist community as a whole could probably benefit from a guide book – especially for people thinking about getting into naturism. Then that turned into a podcast and then launching a non-profit. The non-profit – Global Naturist Alliance – has a social justice arm to it that we just haven’t seen on a large scale globally with naturist organizations and we really think the naturist movement simply cannot progress without it.

We will be looking for board members from all over the world representing different countries. The goal is to not only collect data from our communities and create a Global Field Guide to Naturism but to also set the mission, vision, and values of the Naturist movement worldwide.

Without a vision, a movement has no gas.

Naturism, for me, is where environmentalism, social nudism, and feminism collide. You’ll see that reflected in this podcast. I hope you enjoy it!

Mandy Z.

Skinny Dippers Club
Mandy@SkinnyDippers.Club 

 

Naturist Podcast Ep. 5 // Our chat with Hector Martinez, Mexico Naturist Advocate

SHOW NOTES

Mandy:

Welcome to the naturist podcast. I’m your host, Mandy Z. And I’m joined by my dude, Jeremy. We are naturists and live like curious five-year-olds on the weekends. The reason we look so happy is because we live in a nudist park where we can frolic naked amongst our tree friends whenever we want to.

 

I have never felt so comfortable in my skin since taking the punches and naturalism. I’ve never felt so body positive and now I want everyone to join me. So thank you for being here!



Hi guys. How are you doing? We just got off a two-hour phone call with Hector Martinez who is down in Guadalajara, Mexico. And what a wonderful conversation that was.

 

Jeremy:

Yeah, it was great. It was like, we were just chatting with her friend for two hours. It was exceptional.

 

Mandy:

I’ve listened to a lot of his YouTube stuff. I follow him on Twitter and I’ve always felt like he’s very well-spoken and he does a really great job with kind of a conversational interview type style. And it was, it was great. He is a huge naturist advocate in Mexico, and I believe he was also president of the Mexican naturist Federation. We talked about some of the bizarre things around nudist parks in the States, such as the time that Jeremy visited Lake Bronson up here in Washington state. He was told that as a straight man in order to visit, he’d have to come back with a notarized note from his wife, me, to visit there. We also chatted about how to make nude spaces safe for trans people, including how to define bathroom signs, to be more inclusive to varying genders. Now, did I say that right, Jeremy?

 

Jeremy:

I think you did well. We’re still learning it’s as a yeah. We’re still learning

 

Mandy:

Well, and then actually it brought us to an interesting conversation with Hector about the use of pronouns and how they’re going to be different in every language. And that’s actually something that we plan on, including in the naturist field guide, which is proper use of pronouns.

 

Jeremy:

Our conversation with Hector actually reminded me of a conversation I had with some folks with work who talked about the Spanish language and how some folks in the culture were really offended at the way in which white people were, were kind of betraying the Latin language. So like they would use terms like Latin X instead of Latino or Latina, because it’s just so part of their language that there are masculine and feminine descriptors in, in their language. So it was interesting to have the gender neutral conversation with somebody who is a native Spanish speaker, because it’s just so part of their language that they had that he was having a hard time understanding how to wrap their brain around creating language that was gender neutral. 

 

Mandy:

Well, cause we’ve even seen some seemingly progressive naturist/nudists organizations, and they’re young and they still define things as man and woman and couples.

 

Jeremy:

Yeah. There’s I mean, even some of the things like the ratio of male to female attendees or that sort of thing. It’s, it’s still very, very much a binary subculture.

 

Mandy:

Yeah. So it’s MLK day in the States. Jeremy tell us what MLK day is for the rest of us that are not in the States.

 

Jeremy:

Well, it’s interesting because we actually led off with, with talking about this being MLK day with Hector. So Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Was in the United States, he was a United States civil rights leader. And he was assassinated at really at his, his prime and the, the the civil rights movement continued, but not with the same veracity that was sparked by his leadership. And, you know, one of the things that we were so, so today is, is celebrating him as a, as a leader in, in the United States and his civil rights movement, and a lot of, a lot of organizations like the organization that I work for provide a holiday so that we can take time off and observe the holiday with really the, the idea that you would reflect on the contribution that, that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr made to American society, United States pretty

 

Mandy:

You’ve had some spectacular events at work for MLK…

 

Jeremy:

Day. Yes. Yes. Every year my organization has a Martin Luther King Jr celebration. And people come in as guest speakers, there’s performers people from all different walks of life and nationalities and colors come in and we really celebrate diversity on around this time of year, every year and reflect on, on the civil rights movement.

 

Mandy:

Earlier you were talking about all of, all of the civil rights

training you got when you were a bus driver.

 

Jeremy:

Yeah. So I started my career in public service, working for a transit agency down in the Portland area. And as a, as an employee to a transit agency, there’s actually quite a bit of focus around Rosa Parks and the movement of segregation or of boycotting the bus company.

 

Mandy:

You’re losing your words too much coffee, my friends.

 

Jeremy:

Today’s show notes are really minimal and that’s why I’m losing my words.

 

Mandy:

Yeah. We have no show notes. I was like, Jeremy, you want to go off the cuff? Let’s go off the cuff. So now that we’re totally off, oh, you were talking about, you got a lot of training when you were a bus driver, partly because they in the bus, the bus industry is that they like to hire from the neighborhood. Is that what you were telling me?

 

Jeremy:

Yeah. So typically transit organizations hire people that work or that live in the community because you are serving that community. And one of the big things about transit is really about civil rights because Rosa Parks, as many of you know, she defied the orders of the bus driver and, and refused to sit in the back of the bus. And that was during the time of segregation in the South. So there was a movement to boycott that bus company, and that really led to some advancement in diversity and desegregating organizations and places in the South. And it kept adding to the civil rights movement. It was just one of the many things going on, but we would learn a lot about that within the transit authority, because you do serve the entire population. You serve people who have disabilities. You serve people of different communities. We’d go through Chinatown. And

 

Mandy:

Same reason I loved riding the bus, Oh, I rode the bus for 20 years. It had its downsides too. I remember someone at 8:00 AM drunk as hail passed out on my shoulder on my way to work

 

Jeremy:

My own personal journey – that’s when I really started learning about civil rights and diversity. It was when I was a bus driver and I drove through cause

 

Mandy:

You were a little white boy from a little white, white town.

 

Jeremy:

Yeah. I grew up in a really waspy part of town and 

 

Mandy:

Tanya Hardings hometown for those at home who, who know who that is. Bust those kneecaps.

 

Jeremy:

Yeah. So working for the transit authority was a big change in life for me.

 

Mandy:

You, you had, you had some of the sketchiest bus lines there for awhile.

 

Jeremy:

Yeah. I had some experiences.

 

Mandy:

Did you say the only time you got beat up as a bus driver was from some meth-head white dude?

 

Jeremy:

Yeah. It was a white guy and I never had an issue with anybody, any person of color at all. It was, it was always the white people that gave me the most problems on, on the bus.

 

Mandy:

Everyone’s going to think all we do is bash on white people. We don’t..

 

Jeremy:

There’s a lot more white people to bash on

 

Mandy:

That’s fair.

 

Jeremy:

But so today we really did take the opportunity to reflect on, on civil rights on Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. And a lot of different topics. It was really an appropriate day to have that conversation.

 

Mandy:

I feel like you spent your day off wisely. We talked about equity and social justice, and really tried to get, you know, Hector’s in Mexico and he has a global platform. So to be able to get out the word to, you know, naturist, nudists worldwide that we are a safe space. I like to say that we are a block home because I used to ride the bus home late at night from work. And so I would always search out places that I could run to should anything happen because I was taking the bus really late at night by myself, you know? And

 

Jeremy:

You know what, I’m sorry to interrupt you, but just like we ended up clarifying with Hector, what a block home was.

 

Mandy:

I think we ought to do that. Feel free to interrupt me right now.

 

Jeremy:

Okay. I’m going to interrupt you right now. So,

 

It’s a less familiar concept today than what it was in the seventies, eighties and early nineties block homes were, were actually a little placard that you could get for your house. And basically what that meant was is as you are walking to school or walking through the neighborhood, every block was supposed to have a home with a placard in these walkable neighborhoods that you could go to. If a kid was feeling like they were bullied or the unmarked white van pulled up and they had something other than candy, then you could run away from it and run to this block home.

 

Mandy:

I remember it being like a sign, a sign that was colorful. 

 

Jeremy:

That’s what I meant by placard – that people put in their front windows. So you could see it from when you were walking on the sidewalk that 

 

Mandy:

I had one, three houses away. And I always knew that was the house to go to

 

Jeremy:

When I went to work for transit, we actually had a logo for the buses and it said “radio help” because oftentimes, well actually before cell phones there, people had to find ways to get help that was before the 9-1-1 system. So transit buses adopted this idea that because they were connected by radio to dispatch, they could make emergency calls. So people could run to any transit bus and feel like it was a block home and they could get on and the bus driver would call in an emergency. So it was kind of an extra little, almost like a 9-1-1 radio network.

 

Mandy:

I love bus drivers. They have such a hard job and they always made me feel safe. I have so much respect for best drivers, even before I met you as a former bus driver my best friend. So yeah, back to the block home thing, we actually have it stated on our website and I’m actually just going to read it verbatim. As far as the Skinny Dippers Club goes, our logo is to be a bit of a block home. If you are at a nudist or a naturist event, it signals that the person wearing or using the logo is safe to talk to. It’s part of why we are building the community so slowly and have a small social media following. We are a word of mouth club because safety is at the forefront of who we are. 

 

And, you know, back to this, taking the bus late at night and the block home thing, I’ve always looked at the pride flag as a safe symbol when I would ride the bus late at night, you know, the only things that were open were bars.

 

So I’d be like, okay, if I get into trouble on this bus line, where do I run to? Well, if I could pick a straight bar or a gay bar, I’m running to the gay bar, because to me that means safety. And I knew that I could run to safety. Jeremy and I have had many conversations about women and my safety and how I feel in different situations. And it’s come up a lot more since we’ve been running around naked, but I don’t know one woman whose number one priority while walking in the dark is isn’t, you know, I don’t want to get raped. That’s my number one priority. When walking around, anywhere in the dark with places I’m not aware of…

 

And, but I mean, that’s what we think about. So it’s, it’s always with us just like black people are always wearing the color of their skin on them. They’re always black. It does not come off. And that’s actually the name of Timothy’s blog that we mentioned a few episodes back and he wrote an excellent blog on the subject. And I will always be a woman that is looking out for those things. And, you know, we want to make our community as safe as possible for various reasons. And this is one of them.

 

Jeremy:

Well, it’s interesting that you, you were talking about walking in the dark and one of the, you know, some of the things that we work on is, is trying to give reviews and explain to people what it’s like to experience some of these different parks, beaches, hotsprings, public spaces – navigating the natural world is a lot like wandering around in the dark. You need to find it naked. So you need to find a buddy with a flashlight, a map, and a rape whistle.

"Well, it's interesting that you were talking about walking in the dark and one of the things that we work on is trying to give reviews and explain to people what it's like to experience some of these different parks, beaches, hotsprings, public spaces...navigating the natural world is a lot like wandering around in the dark. And you need to find it naked. So you need to find a buddy with a flashlight, a map, and a rape whistle."
Jeremy

Mandy:

And you can do that if you look for the pride flag. Yeah. And on that note, that’s also why we love that Skinny Dippers is behind a paywall. I mean, we, we also talked about that with Hector. I think it’s really important. You know, part of the reason that we charge to be in our community, it’s about $12.97 a month – or a Netflix membership. And we charge so that we can always be upgrading our safety features, We charge so that I can be the moderator and not Mark Zuckerberg. And we charge so that we can create our safety and keep it safe so that, you know, people have a space to feel comfortable. And one of the things we were talking about is home nudists and how a lot of you guys are nudists, but, or naturists or whatever, but the closest place to take your clothes off in public is like a six-hour drive. And for Jeremy, he loves that it’s behind a paywall because he’s not, he’s a government official. He can’t be running around on the internet naked – he tried and he got in trouble, he almost got fired. 

 

Jeremy:

But you know, actually, that’s one of the things that I really like about being able to come and get plugged into the community. I,

 

Mandy:

You get so excited when you come home, I’m telling you guys I’m not kidding. And the last week, Oh, since we installed the chat feature,

 

Jeremy:

Yes. It has been fun. It’s been a bit of a game-changer. Yeah. It has been fun to chat with people on skinny dippers club. So I work on a lot of heavy stuff at work every day I work in, in government

 

So I’m basically responsible for the safe transportation of human lives. And that, that really, it weighs on you a lot.

 

Mandy:

You have a lot of trees falling down on cars and killing people and all sorts of stuff, climate change.

 

Jeremy:

Yeah. So, so I love to escape to my off duty living, which is being a nudist. And I love my naturist friends in the community. And the other thing that I, that I really like is being able to help shed that light in the darkness of, understand what it’s like to get into the world of naturalism. When we were discussing with Hector earlier today we actually had a really good conversation about the difference between clothing optional and, and the requirement to be naked. And we talked about clear communication and expectations. Yeah.

 

Mandy:

Well, one of the things I’ve noticed because as someone who’s done marketing for so many years, I tend to look through my marketing lens when I look at stuff and I’d like to dissect it, why is this working? Why is it not working? What are trends that I’m noticing that when you put them together, you get “this” result. And the thing that I have noticed is that when you have a clothing-optional space for people, it tends to be far more diverse and you get younger people. So the two best experiences, you know, Hector asked us, you know, about our experiences with nudism in the States. And I said it, and I still say, I think 80% of our experiences have actually been bad. I think only 20% have been good. And those experiences, those good experiences have been at a very LGBTQ friendly beach – Collins Beach on Sauvie Island in Portland, Oregon, which is not surprising for Portland and Rooster Rock, which is kind of down the street.

 

Jeremy:

Those were great experiences. It’s like an hour away, but you know, 

 

Mandy:

it’s in the Portland Metro area in Oregon on the left coast of the United States. For any of you globally that are listening. It’s not surprising that actually anything in Oregon would be welcoming to people because, in the bigger cities in Oregon, that’s what you get. But so our best experiences were in Oregon, which tends to be a very open-minded state. It was at progressive yes. There at the Willamettans, which I talked about endlessly, which is a nudist park. It’s a very, it’s, you know, they’re affiliated with AANR, but they’re a really good nudist park. They are clothing-optional. They are a clothing optional nudist park, which typically when you go to an AANR affiliated nudist park in the States, they’re very big on have to be, have to be 100% naked. And then the other place is we talked about last episode is Tuscany Manor, which is a boutique hotel in Palm Springs, and they are clothing-optional. And they’re also 21. Plus it’s Palm

 

So when putting all of these elements together what I realized was that a lot of the discussion in the naturist nature’s community is “how do we, how do we become more diverse? How do we bring younger people into it?” Make it clothing-optional. I feel like that’s the gateway drug. And we talked a bit about that with Hector too, because he was talking about how his community used to be clothing-optional, and now it’s not. And I totally understand all of his reasoning and it makes sense. And I want you guys to listen to the episode because it was super interesting. And just because people have a different way of looking at something, doesn’t make it wrong. It just makes it different. And I love hearing different views on how people experience naturism. And so in my experience in the States doing this, it has been that when we go to clothing-optional places, I see more people that are my people there.

 

Jeremy:

I wouldn’t disagree with that. And I think the other thing that I have a tendency to, and we also talked about this living in the Pacific Northwest, it’s cold a lot

 

Mandy:

It’s cold other than six weeks out of the year.

 

Jeremy:

Yeah. And it rains a lot, even in the summertime, it rains and evenings can be breezy. So going to places that are strictly clothing-free can be really difficult particularly in the Pacific Northwest. And I think I have found just about every event that I’ve been to with other nudist friends, we have arrived, we’re clothed. We get out to the beach or the pool or whatever. And we, we do strip down. But it, it’s almost like you go through the whole process together. And it’s really rare that I’ve been to a Pacific Northwest event where at some point, somebody isn’t wearing a towel, a cover-up a shirt something, because they’re either, they’re either getting too much sun on their body. Or

 

Mandy:

I need to cover up. Even when we’ve, when it’s warm,

 

Jeremy:

I’m not a big sunscreen wearer. So, cause I don’t like putting, putting the chemical stuff on. It makes me feel gross and slippery. 

 

Mandy:

I have to say though, on a side note, one of the funniest things that happened to me in the last few weeks I went to get I’m, I’m getting, I’m getting all sorts of stuff done to me because sitting and working on laptops really bad for your lower back. So I’ve been working through some lower back issues with my masseuse, who is also named Mandy because everyone needs a Mandy in their life – and not surprisingly, she is phenomenal, but she whips the, the sheet off of me. She goes, “You’re tan from head to toe.” And I was like, Oh. I was like, “well, this is where I live. And this is what I do for a living.” It felt like a bandaid rip. Cause you know, I don’t know her and her response was, you know, my husband runs around naked in the house all the time and I had another service provider, similar conversation.

 

Cause you know, I’m getting stuff done to my lower back. So you’re going to see stuff and she goes, you know, what do you do for a living? A lot of people ask me this. And I always just try to get out of it. Oh, I work on a laptop all day. Oh, what do you do? What happens is when I tell people I do marketing and social media and digital marketing, then everybody wants my help. So I finally just tell people I do nude stuff. Right. And she’s like, you know, my husband likes to run around outside naked and I’m thinking “how many people are actually like nudists or naturists and they don’t even know it?” You know,

 

Jeremy:

They don’t put a label on it. They just do whatever it is that they do.

 

Mandy:

I wonder if they realize like you could also be in these other spaces doing that. But I think a lot of that also does go back to, we have a stigma problem in the U S that revolves around the nudist. And we talked to Hector about this. It starts with our largest organization being racist and homophobic in the States. That’s a problem.

"We have a stigma problem in the U S that revolves around the nudist. And we talked to Hector about this. It starts with our largest organization being racist and homophobic in the States. That's a problem."
Mandy Zelinka
Skinny Dippers Club

Jeremy:

And that’s why there’s room for communities like ours that really focus on making sure that everybody is safe, and comfortable and feel like they belong. Cause if you don’t feel like you belong, then you’re not going to want to participate or, or be engaged. 

 

Mandy:

Yeah. But I think some of these places don’t want

 

Jeremy:

That’s true. There are some of our other friends who’ve talked about having bad experiences in, certain places because, they have been on the receiving end of really bad comments, statements or behavior as it pertains to racism. You know, people find Trump flags and, and approaching them and just saying the wrong, absolutely the wrong thing that will turn them around.

 

Mandy:

And one of the things that I, so a lot of nudist parks in this state have terrible websites. We also talked about that in a previous episode, but they should have terrible websites because once you get, you can’t have this beautiful new youthful website and then have people show up and realize you’re, you’re not beautiful and new or progressive – that’s bait and switch. We can’t be, can’t be doing that to people either. So they’ve just, I think one of the biggest issues that we were able to talk to Hector about, and it took God, it really got juicy about an hour in, in case you check it out. It’s supposed to be out in a few weeks, but the AANR – they’ve used porn photos in their publications and their social media feeds. 

 

Jeremy:

It’s not porn photos that show sex acts, but I’ll give you an example; there was a post on social media. It was encouraging people to attend an event. And it was an image of a woman hitchhiking. Yeah. It was a black female hitchhiking and 

 

Mandy:

Oh, that’s right. 

 

Jeremy:

It did not appear to actually be, you know, when you look at a photo and you’re like, “that doesn’t seem like that was taken to speak to this audience.” 

 

Mandy:

It looks like “hitchhike with me and we’ll go to this event and we’ll all have some pleasurable times.”

 

Jeremy:

There’s a couple of different websites that you can do a reverse image search. You can take the photo, you put it into their search engine and then it uses the photo to find other similar photos or the same photo. And it found the origin of this photo, which went back to a website about hitchhiker porn in the premise. So they used a still photo from a clip of women of color. Yes. So the expectation without knowing that the history of where the photo came from is that if you go to this particular event, you’re going to find these well-shaped women of color that want to hitchhike in your car and be open and free and whatever. And in reality, it was stolen from a porn video. That’s disgusting to me that, that you, I mean, first of all, you should be, you should know exactly where your images come from and you should get consent to post an image there was,

 

Mandy:

And they wonder why they can’t get any women to take photos for their publications. They’ve been talking about this on Twitter for weeks. “Why won’t any women put their photos on Twitter for the AANR?” Well, I wonder why, like you’re reinforcing all of the stereotypes that all of us are trying to undo so that our families will invite us to Thanksgiving and not think we’re freaks. And here you are throwin’ out all this pornagraphic imaging! People have called them out on it and they continue to do it. They not only continue to do it – here’s the other thing people on Twitter have been saying, “Oh, but you know, they’re changing. They’re, they’re bringing young people into the fold – things are changing.”

 

They’re not changing! They are not changing. They have had young people, LGBTQ people and people of color on their committees and what they have done has since either kicked them off of them, or there were undermine the whole time at Heather contracts turn terminated. They’re an abusive organization.

 

It’s as if they’re trying to protect their base and you know, once their base has gone and then they don’t, they’re not going to be a viable organization. 

 

Jeremy:

Yeah. And, you know, it’s unfortunate that the racism and the homophobia runs so deep in the organization. And, and it’s, some of it is just blatant in other parts is a lot of microaggressions. I mean, we’ve experienced that, just going to parks, having the microaggressions, like there was the woman that told you, you should just tuck your string up into your hoo-ha or, you know, don’t, “you shouldn’t be ashamed everybody’s naked underneath their clothes.” 

 

Mandy:

That woman. 

 

Jeremy:

It’s those kinds of microaggressions that just have no place in what we consider naturism. And I don’t think it belongs in any form of naturism, but I know that it exists.

"It's those kinds of microaggressions that just have no place in what we consider naturism. And I don't think it belongs in any form of naturism, but I know that it exists."
Jeremy

We need to change the face of naturism

The racism and homophobia runs deep at AANR and it's at the highest levels. It comes from people that have big social media presences on Twitter. The AANR is not a good organization and they are considered the leaders in this movement in the States. If that's the “so-called face of naturism” then the face of naturalism in the States is inherently racist and homophobic.
Mandy Z
Skinny Dippers Club

Mandy:

Well, I’m gonna, I’m gonna bring up a quote while we’re sitting here. You can keep talking. 

 

Jeremy:

It was fantastic. 

 

Mandy:

And also an incredibly depressing quote, going back to when Randy and Evan were on the new nudist podcast? And he had Randy, who is a black man, had a spectacular quote. And I just think it really it’s one of the best quotes I’ve read about nudism in the States and the AANR. 

 

And he said, “I don’t want any symbols reminding me that people hate me in reference to the Trump flags. That was one of the most surreal, strange things that my brain could not put together. How are you pro counter culturalism, cultural culturalism, and also still pro oppression? I was sad.”

 

I’m sad too! He, he said it so perfectly and eloquently in that quote, how are you pro counter culturalism and also still pro oppression?

 

We have have some hippies living here – and they are still hippies. Let me tell you, but how does, what happens over, over the course of time that a movement goes so far from what it’s supposed to be? Or was it always like that? And they just kept it on the DL. I mean, in the States, I have to say this whole Trump thing has really brought out a lot of people out of the woodwork that you may not have known were racist and such. I always say there’s always a lot of “racist light”, like undercover racism. People are racist, but they just keep it to themselves and keep the racism at home. Like we know that that happens, but Trump has emboldened these people to make statements. And I’m, if that’s part of what is, you know, it’s a reckoning for a lot of the global naturist communities because of these things. I mean,

 

Jeremy:

Well, even if it’s just not outright racism, I know that one of the parks that I made an attempt to, to get into and go back to we, we had disagreements about the way in which privacy was protected and the way in which people arrived at the park. And it was just really disappointing that they gave no regard to the individuals that they were trying to bring in, that they just wanted to run their business however they want, basically they were running their business the way that they wanted to. And if you’re comfortable just kind of going Willy nilly about the business and doing some shady stuff, then you’re welcome to come in. But

 

Mandy:

We talked about that a lot in the first two episodes as well. So, yeah. I mean, I think this is a great subject to be taking up on MLK day in the States and The racism and homophobia runs deep at AANR and it’s at the highest levels. It comes from people that have big social media presences on Twitter. The AANR is not a good organization and they are considered the leaders in this movement in the States. If that’s the “so-called face of naturism” then the face of naturalism in the States is inherently racist and homophobic.

"How are you pro counter culturalism and also still pro oppression?"
Randy
New Nudist Podcast

Jeremy:

So we need to change the face of naturism.

 

Mandy:

I think a little defunding needs to happen.

Jeremy:

Well, yes. If you are like us and see that there needs to be a change in the face of naturism, you can stop giving your dollars to the organizations that have those racist and homophobic undertones and start supporting some non-landed clubs or other organizations. 

Mandy:

I know that one of the main issues is that to get into some of these places, like we still want to go to the Willlametans, you have to either have a TNS card or an AANR card. Right? 

Jeremy:

Yep. 

Mandy:

So we will just keep our TNS card then. Correct? 

Jeremy:

Yes. 

Mandy:

Yeah. So I, I don’t know what else the solution is because I don’t, this is something that this is an organization that has, I feel like it’s, it’s had to have been set up that way. It’s been that way for years, right? It’s been very white, very male-dominated. And we’ve seen that with the Republican party in the States, very white male-dominated. They are only, they’re not doing the right thing, but when people stopped giving them money, most recently after this whole coup attempt in the U S people, big corporations –  they stopped giving to the Republican PACs. (Political Action Committee). You had all these large corporations stopped giving any of the money forever. A lot of them said, we are never giving you money ever again, because you supported a coup and that’s wrong. All of a sudden these Republicans had a change of heart. Didn’t they? Didn’t they Jeremy?

Jeremy:

They did. It was over literally overnight that once their political, once their donations to their packs dried up from corporations that didn’t want to be affiliated with the coup, then all of a sudden people were, were against the, the direction of the current administration, which is only going to be in effect for two more days.

Mandy:

Oh, two more days. Are we getting drunk? I feel like we’re, besides the fact that my birthday’s coming up, I feel like, Oh, I just want to get drunk and celebrate but Oh my God, I can’t tell you guys what it’s been like living in the States for the last four years. It’s just been, I even, I haven’t noticed, I don’t know if you noticed this, Jeremy. Oh, well actually you were spending more time in the community, chatting with your friends this weekend. We were not glued to Twitter this weekend. It was wonderful. We have been waking up every morning. I’m sure like a lot of you that live in the States have been looking at your Twitter feed to see what that Dick did again, like, okay, what’s new today?

Jeremy:

Well, and because we live on the West coast Washington DC goes to work before we do. So by the time I wake up to go to work Washington DC is already three hours into their business day.

Mandy:

I mean, did you notice that this weekend, like, I felt like I was able to exhale like it’s almost over. Yeah. I hope I don’t regret saying that because I know there’s a ton of crazy stuff.

Jeremy:

A lot of things can happen in 48 hours

Mandy:

Just knowing that he’s on the way out. I feel like, I feel like the entire nation has breathed a collective sigh of relief just for that. I know we still have a lot of work to do, which actually brings us to back to MLK day and what our current mission feels like. Because, you know, not only are we very much into equity and social justice but what does that actually mean? And the more I have discussions around this issue with fellow nudists in our community, the more things I find out are bad. And I don’t, I don’t want to talk about bad things all the time. I think this will be the last time we actually talk about the AANR, because I don’t think they’re a good organization. We need to stop funding them and amplifying organizations that don’t denounce racism or homophobia. I feel like that’s a full stop.

 

Jeremy:

That, that is a full stop. And you know, that’s where I was leading a little bit ago that you know, we need to get plugged into some of these other organizations, whether it be Skinny Dippers Club or Global Naturist Alliance. We are working towards getting a non-profit set up – it’s called the Global Naturist Alliance. And we’re actually looking for some help. So if you or somebody, you know has an interest in trying to make sure that, that there can be beacons of hope in the naturist community on a global scale we are working towards establishing a board of directors and finding some help with legal services. Put the word out there to your community and see if somebody wants to help join in on our global naturist Alliance. Okay.

Mandy:

I don’t think we’ve seen anyone in this community so far take up online censorship. And that was another thing we were talking to Hector about how important it is to, you know, be aware of how online censorship is going, because not only could Facebook be taken down, which also includes Instagram, you know, who knows what’s going on with Twitter? I know that Patreon is probably pretty good cause you’ve got Alexis Ohanian who is he’s on the board and is Serena’s husband. So I’d like to think he’s a good guy, but you know, not all white people can save the world, but we’re trying, we’re really trying. So to get the show notes, read our blog or subscribe to this podcast, head over to naturist podcast.com. Our podcast drops again this Friday, just in time to listen, to read or watch over the weekend. So you can come hang out with us. And I think we decided that this was going to be a year long podcast, right? What you make your long project.

Jeremy:

We’re starting this as a year-long project. And then after that, we’ll see where we go.

Mandy:

Yeah. I wouldn’t mind handing it over to the Global Naturist Alliance for someone to take over the podcast.

So we’ll see you next week. You guys thank you for joining us. And if you’d like to help the Global Naturist Alliance, you can do so by taking a screenshot of this podcast, posting it on your social media and tagging us. And by the way, the URL is www.naturistpodcast.com and five-star reviews are always appreciated. See you next week, guys. Thanks everyone.

 

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Good public health protocols. That’s what it boils down to. 

 

Anyone noticed that you probably haven’t caught many colds in the last year since we’ve done all of this?

 

The Social Safety Initiative is really aimed at helping keep society safe, particularly during an epidemic, pandemic or other extraordinary events. 

 

We do social safety training. We do risk assessments. We have an easy manual for folks to understand how to keep their business or community place.

 

We want our Skinny Dippers to be safe particularly through events and social safety initiatives. 

 

SSI was started during the pandemic with a focus on getting safety equipment out to essential workers and they partner with organizations to provide worker grade safety materials and supplies like masks and visors, cleaners, hand sanitizers, all kinds of stuff. 

 

We do want to have events. We want to do it when it’s safe. And when the pandemic has subsided or, ya know, when we are able to do stuff this year. 

 

So when we co-sponsor events in the future, we will have these really great protocols with Dr. Lorelei, who’s putting this whole program together. Part of our mission is to also have various safe events not only with consent but also with actual health safety involved so that everyone has a good time and doesn’t get sick.