EP. 7 Nude Scout // Jeremy’s Journey with PTSD

Naturism and It’s Positive Effects on Mental Health

I've been discovering along the way, people that actually recognize that you can learn and grow and change and develop, and that you can use the experience of running around naked to better yourself. And it's not some creepy experience.
Jeremy
Skinny Dippers Club

EP. 7 Nude Scout // Jeremy’s Journey with PTSD

Show Notes

https://amp.theguardian.com/world/2021/jan/25/covid-linked-to-risk-of-mental-illness-and-brain-disorder-study-suggests?__twitter_impression=true

Speaker 1:

Today, we’re joined with Jeremy who is a PTSD survivor. Tell us what PTSD is. Jeremy

Speaker 2:

PTSD is an acronym for post-traumatic stress disorder, which is the disorder that is caused from experiencing an abnormal event in your brain processing that abnormal event.

Speaker 1:

And how does PTSD affect you in your daily life?

Speaker 2:

It affects each person differently. But some of the symptoms could be things like depression, anxiety, phobias I mean, and it could affect you in many ways. Even just having unreasonable fears or what seems like unreasonable fears, or maybe even you have some traumatic nightmares about the, the original traumatic event

Speaker 1:

This summer. Well, this past year has been very hard for a lot of people is pandemic has been just life-changing and Jeremy ended up having a what’d you call it a PTSD relapse?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I, yeah, I would say it’s it was probably a relapse or some people might call it a break.

Speaker 1:

One of the things I’ve noticed about Jeremy and his PTSD is that it is of utmost importance for him to have other friends that have experienced or gone through PTSD. And we’ve actually noticed since we’ve been living at a nude park, that there’s a fair amount of people that live here that have PTSD. And I get that because living around nature is calming and it’s very helpful for those that suffer from it. But one of the most interesting things, I think I learned this summer with what you went through, he was actually off work for three months. It was, it was a big deal. That’s part of the reason why we went to my parents’ property so that we could just get out of Dodge and chill.

Speaker 2:

Get away from everybody and everything. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

You know, it was like four hours away from where we live, but there’s this thing called I, one of our friends, actually, it was my friend and then he stole her. 

Jeremy

We have a lot in common. 

Mandy

They do, they have a ton in common and on levels that like, I can’t even comprehend. So it’s been fantastic for him to have can I say her name? I don’t think she would care. Okay. It’s been fantastic for him to have Miranda to talk to. And you know, she’s, she’s one of my dearest friends, absolutely adore her. Our kids are around the same age. They played baseball together. And you, because of the work that she has been doing with her own PTSD, you found out that there’s is it, what is it when you have complex PTSD? Can you explain what complex PTSD is? Because you, you you went through a situation in your early twenties, mid twenties.

Speaker 2:

It was 27, 26.

Speaker 1:

Jeremy was a bus driver, and then he was also a light rail operator. And there’s a lot of fatalities that happen when you’re in that line of work. And he went through some of that where people actually died because they got hit by the light rail car or the bus. And he went through, you went through a bunch of stuff then to try to work yourself through it. Like you went to a therapist and you did all sorts of – tell me about some of the training, not training, but some of the things you went through to, to get through the PTSD.

Speaker 2:

Well, actually training was actually a part of that too. So as Mandy said, I worked for a transit authority and I had some incidents on the bus side, but then when I went to rail and light rail is basically for those of you may not be familiar with it –  it’s like a commuter rail. It operates in the same gauge trackway as, as regular railroad cars, like BNSF or Union Pacific or anything like that. It’s just, they operate under electric power instead of diesel electric power. So you have to follow all the rules and guidelines. Anyway, long story short, I did have a railroad fatality followed by another incident where somebody stepped out in front of me and the individual lost both of his both of his legs. And in the process of trying to come to terms with the fact that I, that I sat with somebody who died from being struck by my train in my arms. And then I’m trying to pull somebody out from underneath my train and there wasn’t anything connected to his foot. 

Speaker 1:

That’s rough. You were like 25, 26. Oh, I can’t imagine.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. That can mess you up. 

Speaker 1:

But then didn’t you literally go off in the woods for six weeks?

Speaker 2:

For six weeks. I did. Yeah. I kinda, I left work for a while and just, I mean, that was kinda my first big, like, Ooh, can’t take it. And, you know, one of the things I was learning, actually with Dr. Lorelei recently, cause we were talking about traumatic events and COVID related impacts. So at the age of 26, your brain is not fully developed yet. It’s actually not until you’re a very late twenties, like 27, 28, sometimes even as, as late in life, as, as 30.

But if you have certain setbacks, like if you have PTSD as a child, if you’ve been, if you’ve encountered traumatic events, then that can actually slow the development of some certain parts of your brain. So

Speaker 1:

I don’t think that did with you though, did it, or did it?

Speaker 2:

Not, not to a detrimental effect, but I’m sure there’s probably some portions of my brain that had a negative impact because of, of traumatic experience.

Speaker 1:

So because of some of the things that happened this summer around his job and the pandemic and riots and all sorts of stuff, he, he had a PTSD relapse and then also found out that there was a thing called complex PTSD. And with that, you didn’t realize – it’s funny cause this the whole time I’ve known Jeremy, I’ve known you what, 10 years now? I’m like, man, this guy is just so capable. He takes everything in stride. And the whole time though, I’ve been like, this dude is going to crack. There’s no way he can be this smooth and not crack. And yeah. And so when he did it didn’t surprise to me at all. I was kinda like out with my open arms, like, all right, I’m ready to catch you. Now, I’ve been waiting for this the entire time I’ve known you. But what I didn’t realize is the same thing you didn’t realize is that there’s complex PTSD, which is when you have, is it multiple things happen to you and they compound themselves, but you only dealt with the one set of issues. You know, the one that you went through in your twenties and you hadn’t dealt with the ones that happened in your early childhood, and this is where I’m gonna let you take the wheel.

Speaker 2:

So, well, I never really finished about what, what I went through during, after my, my rail fatality. Okay. So I’ll back up complex PTSD. So during this summer, when I was off and going through some counseling sessions and treatment with therapy and actually Miranda was a big help in that too, because she has been helping others in her community and she lives in the Midwest. So anytime, anytime we’ve been talking, it’s been like Marco Polo or FaceTime or text or email or whatever. But anyway, realizing that the time during which I had my rail fatalities, I was actually coping with some other traumatic stress in my life that I hadn’t fully dealt with. And this summer the events of George Floydand  increased communications around the political campaigns and all of the anxiety going on in the United States really brought up some things from my youth and early twenties that I had never dealt with as a young young person.

Speaker 2:

But the impact of the fatality was so huge that I went through that treatment and I saw a psychologist at the time I got some drugs. So I was almost there. So I did some EMDR therapy, that’s eye movement, desensitization and restoration. And I actually found an individual that had combined that with some other therapies to a therapy called thought field therapy, where you use pressure points on your body. It’s kind of a, it’s a mix of some Eastern like ancient medicine where it’s not necessarily acupuncture, but it’s pressure points combined with kind of aligning your eyes and light mixing some conversations from the left side of your brain, your right side of your brain to kind of clear some clogged pathways in your brain

Speaker 1:

Every time we have a conversation about almost anything I learn something new about you, which actually brings me to the point of why the podcast is listed under alternative health. This has been such a profound experience for you that a lot of people talk about how naturism is good for body image and all these other things. But I think it’s been mental health has, has just

Speaker 2:

For me, naturism has been the gateway to increased mental health and a form of mental health therapy. And actually I would go a step further working on Skinny Dippers and connecting with people on Instagram, on Twitter. I’m just building my own friend network of naturists that has been a form of therapy as well. I think, you know, when you live in a community of just people that are shoved together in apartment complexes or in a, in a neighborhood without any thought behind it, other than, okay, the crime stats are low and the schools are good and the walk score score is above and sixty. So therefore I want to live there…when you look at it from that perspective, and you don’t look at the people like you don’t really, really look at the people, then there’s no benefit to your mental health from getting to know people perspective because you just get to know people because they happen to be your neighbors. Whereas when you get into a nudist community, you start to know people in the community. And we based our decision about moving here because we felt like it was going to be a community that we could, we could thrive in. And we had a lot of conversations.

Speaker 1:

We thought it was going to be of fun to move here. And it was for, for a lot of the time.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. And it’s getting better. So there’s been some changes here. But one of the things that I’ve found in the naturist community is that people are really willing to open up and talk about is their mental health. I don’t find that with any of my other friend circles at work or other places like I used to, I used to be a student pilot. You’d never talk about mental health and as you’re sitting in ground school, because I think people would think you’re crazy about talking about mental health and yeah. Then you’d get kicked out of ground school. I was doing some drone work and I was in some drone chat groups and stuff in, and you don’t talk about mental health near the way you talk about it in, in this community. And I think that’s phenomenal because people are really focused on the whole of the body and the brain. I also learned hanging out with Dr. Lorelei is your brain takes up about 2% of your body mass, but it uses about 20% of your blood and oxygen. It just does its thing, because it’s the CPU for your whole body. So central processing unit. So it’s the computer for your body.

Speaker 1:

Well, but the other thing too, is that naturists and nudists tend to go deep quick. So, you know, they’re not afraid to be vulnerable. You’re naked. So it’s like, okay, well, I’m already naked around you. I’m already being vulnerable buy not having my clothes on. So what do you want to talk about? I can talk about anything now that my clothes are off because you know what I mean, I feel comfortable enough around with you naked. I’m going to feel comfortable around you enough to share some pretty deep stuff.

Speaker 2:

Let’s talk about that up thing that happened to me 20 years ago.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. Because the judgment isn’t there.

Speaker 2:

I think when I knew that I really started finding my people is when I connected with, I will now call him my friend, Phil. He has an Instagram @WildThingsandHotSprings. And he too is a PTSD survivor, different form of PTSD. He was in the military and military PTSD is much different than, but similar, I mean, some of the experiences and some of the signs and the way that you treat it is the same, but his experience is much different than mine. But he found a path to being at peace by finding hot springs and being out in nature. And the wild things and hot Springs Instagram really spoke to me because he talked about how peaceful things were when he was out in nature. And he would have to share the experiences of him and his wife going to,

Speaker 1:

And he also has a fantastic wife.

Speaker 2:

He does. So 

Speaker 1:

She’s part of the Best Wives Club

Speaker 2:

But I’ve actually since found a couple of other people too, that I’ve connected with that have struggled with mental health along the way. And they’ve discovered that by being in this inclusive community of naturists and nudists, they feel more at ease because they can talk about their struggles. And when you can talk about your struggles with other people,

Speaker 1:

Especially as a straight male,

Speaker 2:

You can just feel like you’re a part of a community and you belong. And when I run in the circles of my other professional colleagues, because I’m in public works and I’ve been to a lot of public works conferences, and I have a lot of public works friends, really, There tends to be a lot of beige at those meetings. It usually means a lot of khakis. And I’m like, wow,

Speaker 1:

Really nice people though, really smart and

Speaker 2:

Super nice people, but you don’t talk about mental health. You talk about where did you go to school and what project did you work on? And blah, blah, blah, what size rock did you use for that drainage project? And anyway,

Speaker 1:

That’s cause you also have a lot of engineers, which don’t typically tend to be on the emotional scale of things.

Speaker 2:

They’re not so much touchy, feely people. Yeah. So I like the touchy, feely, mentally healthy people that I’ve, I’ve been discovering along the way, people that actually recognize that you can learn and grow and change and develop, and that you can use the experience of running around naked to better yourself. And it’s not some creepy experience.

Speaker 1:

You’ve not had male friends, almost your entire life. And you finally have male friends.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I do actually. So one of the, one of my closest male friends that I first started out with just a few years ago was our friend that I met through a similar non landed club. And I still have a few friends from that non landed club. And it’s been fantastic. I’ve been able to bond with male friends in a way that I’ve never been able to before. Well, and

Speaker 1:

I feel like a lot of that you’ve told me is because straight dudes, a lot of times just, they don’t go deep.

Speaker 2:

No, and actually it’s interesting because the, the,

Speaker 1:

And I’ve, I’ve seen that just with my guy friends over the years. Cause I’ve, I’ve typically had mostly guy friends over the years and

Speaker 2:

Yeah, my best guy friends are gay and BI men. And they tend to, at least from what I’ve seen with the group of people that I’ve hung out with, they’re gay or BI there’s a few straight guys in there too. But the thing that we all have in common is that we all enjoy going to nude beaches, hot springs spas, where we go in and get treatments and hang out in the steam room, the sauna room and the hot and cold tubs and stuff. And we like to just hang out and chat. And

Speaker 1:

Which cracks me up because like, you know, having been a hairstylist for years, it’s totally normal for a bunch of chicks to go and get pedicures when they don’t have clients and hang out and do all those spa services. And it’s just been wonderful to watch you enjoy some of those things that I feel like, you know, the rest of us have all known about and have been doing for years. But

Speaker 2:

I like to go get a good pedicure too. I may have done that with some of my skinny dipping buddies.

Speaker 1:

At one point, this dude was like better maintained than I was because he was going, getting full body scrubs, like every other weekend. 

Speaker 2:

It was once a month. 

Speaker 1:

Okay. Well, it just seemed like that was just my jealousy talking.

Speaker 2:

I miss the Korean spa. Cause for 50 bucks you could go in and get a full body scrub and spend all day and then go to the, the Asian buffet and eat yourself silly.

Speaker 1:

Praise be to the Asian buffet while we had it. God, that was good. Aye. He kept telling me about this buffet. And finally I was like, you gotta take me, dude. I was like, you’ve been coming here and you haven’t brought me? You punk! Yeah. You guys made a day of it was so cute. It was awesome. Where are you at in your PTSD journey? Our friend Jim said at one point that you are like peeling an onion. And the guy that I met 10 years ago is so far removed from the person that I know now he’s a completely different person.

Speaker 2:

The guy you met 10 years ago would have been sitting here at a men’s warehouse, oversized suit.

Speaker 1:

Oh yeah. Those were bad. All my girlfriends were like, “don’t run off with the mayor!” And I was like, trust me, I can just redress him and rebrand him. He’ll be fine. But Oh, he just took it all on himself.

Speaker 2:

So where am I at on my PTSD journey? 

Speaker 1:

Well, so it was in the middle of a Twitter discussion the other day about you. And somebody was talking about reclaiming yourself, being a naturist and reclaiming yourself. And I guess I, I hadn’t realized until I got a reaction, like, wow, that’s a big deal that it wasn’t until you fully jumped into naturism, that you had changed your facial hair, you adopted a uniform, you got your full sleeve tattoo. You, what else – you cleaned house with toxic family members… Because that’s, that was part of your complex PTSD which it isn’t easy to, it’s not easy to break up with your family, especially when they don’t understand. And it pains me because you don’t hate your family, all of them. But when people don’t understand that there needs to be boundaries because of things that happened in your childhood, it’s, it really sucks. But you have just, you’ve had to just kind of clean house with that for your mental state.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. And I’ll be honest. I have.  I come from a family that, that was blended from the perspective of step brothers and sisters. And there’s a little bit of abuse from an older step-brother and my step sisters aren’t politically aligned with me by any way, shape or form, and the easiest way to not have triggers there is to just separate myself from the family and just establish my own new life. But I have never been so comfortable with myself than I have been as becoming a naturist. So, as Mandy mentioned, I have a uniform now I didn’t realize that was one of the things that was really stressing me out every day was picking out clothes like I would have, well, she did notice it cause she brought it up a few times before I finally came to the, came to the realization that I actually needed to have a uniform.

Speaker 1:

Well, and part of that is – I read the power of habit years ago. And it talked about how, like, if you don’t have a specific place for your keys and your wallet and all of that, when you walk in the door in the morning, you could have used up almost all of your mental energy, all of your daily capacity for doing anything in finding your keys and your wallet. And you were using up almost all of your daily energy on getting dressed.

Speaker 2:

Well, now that I understand that your brain is 2% of your body mass, but 20% of your energy source…

Speaker 1

Your daily energy is finite. 

Speaker 2

Yeah. Yeah. So if you start burning out your computer early in the morning, it’s not gonna be ready for you in the afternoon. Cause you’ve just burnt a lot of calories through your noggin, trying to process what you’re going to put on your body. So I now have a uniform which I gotta tell you, that’s been probably one of the best choices I’ve made in my entire life. It helps with laundry too,

Speaker 1:

Because nobody wants to do laundry, but especially nudists because we’re like, we never wear clothes and then we have to go wash the ones we do have to wear.

All my clothes are black and all of his clothes are white

Speaker 2:

So actually let me tell you what more of my wardrobe is real quick. So I have five pair of Levi’s jeans. I have nine of these white shirts. Yes, I have nine. So these are Irish granddad shirts that I absolutely love. You can dress them up or you can dress them down. I have one pair of boots that I absolutely love and adore, and I have 10 pair of matching black boot socks. So I can go in and just grab two socks and know they’re always going to match. Even if it’s dark in the closet, I know that they’re going to match.

Speaker 1:

I finally got you to stop tucking in your shirt. What do they say on Letterkenny? 

Speaker 2:

Shirt Tucker’s. I love that show. Sure. I’ve got a few other shirts like yesterday. I wore a plaid shirt out.

Speaker 1:

I can tell you when he switches up his wardrobe, it’s like, Oh, I have a whole new man.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. It’s a whole new world. Now I’ve got a few other pairs of shoes and stuff that I like, but if it’s just my go-to going to work or doing whatever, then I’ve got my, my boots, my socks, my pants and my shirt. That’s what I need. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

You’re, you’re completely different. After, after this summer, you stand up for yourself. You don’t take any shit. You, Oh, it’s just been wonderful to hang out with you. And one of the first things that Jeremy has said, like he’s an Aries whole of, all of my favorite men in my life, my dad, my kids, my boys, they’re all my sister. They’re all areas. Just super sweet, nice kind of passive people. And when we first met, I was like, you have to get to the point where you can tell me to off. You have

Speaker 2:

Well, I finally had to discover myself and I, I had, when I had kids that life actually wasn’t me.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. I think that happens with a lot of people though.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Yeah. So who I am today is who I am and the lifestyle that I’m, that I’m engaged in is the lifestyle that I want to be in. And honestly it’s interesting because you’re a real city girl and it, and I, I’m not a country. Boy. I was raised in suburbia. But I, I was exposed to a lot of country living in Boy Scouts and all kinds of, you know outdoor adventures. So it’s been interesting seeing your evolution because I think that you have actually come more my way than I have your way.

Speaker 1:

Well, but you have to understand, I also grew up going to the farm every weekend. So you were just, I think we both like came back to our roots this summer. Yeah. Playing in the mud and tear down structures and playing in the crick.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Drinking beer. We did really, but we worked our butts off and we actually learned, we learned from the kettlebell studio that replacing some of those carbs immediately after a workout via beer is not all that bad. And it gets you really drunk.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. There’s that. But it does kind of bring us to our idea of having a dude ranch. I mean, in our last episode, we talked about intentional living and we’ve also talked in episode one or two about the positive mental effects of being a naturist. But I think that our experience this past summer was so incredibly profound going back to the roots of his Boy Scout days of my hanging out in the farm with the horses. And like I used to go clean the chicken coop with my cousin. We’d literally go make mud pies in the crick. Like that’s how I spent every weekend of my youth. And we realized just how therapeutic that is, especially for people that are used to being in the city. And we’ve talked about how you always have two phones on you. I always my phone on me. I mean, that’s pretty typical, I think anymore. So, you know, being able to have a place in nature where you can experience that and just chill the out and play in some mud and

Speaker 2:

Can we talk about Nude Scout for a minute?

Speaker 1:

Go for it. 

Speaker 2:

So as we’ve been on this journey and I’ve been feeling better about my own mental health and kind of moving forward and figuring out what things we want to do with Skinny Dippers we came up with this idea of a Nude Scout, I think partly because I’m always like, it’s almost like a double entendre word meaning. So the first meaning of it is I’m, I’m scouting out different ways of being a a naturist.

Speaker 1:

And how people experience it. We’ve yeah. It’s been great having a diverse community because now we’re finding out so many different ways that people experience being a naturist or nudist, you know, does it mean being natural? Does it mean being in nature? It just depends on who you ask as to what it means to them.

Speaker 2:

And then the other side of nude scout, the other meaning of scout is – I did grow up in Boy Scouts here in the United States and I know that scouting is a movement for kids around the world. There’s been a lot of negative talk about the boy scout movement and the, I just want to take the things that I enjoyed the most from my own personal scouting experience and apply it to nude scout. So I can get into that in a little bit though, if you want to.

Speaker 1:

Well, no, I was going to piggyback on that by saying, I’m always talking about how great outdoor school was. And finally, one time I looked at him and I was like, “you went to outdoor school, right? He was like, no, which is weird. He grew up like, what, 20 minutes from me? Yeah. I grew up in the inner city and he was in another city right across the border in  wasp town. So outdoor school, for those of you that haven’t experienced, it is amazing. I went in sixth grade.

Speaker 2:

So sixth grade in the United States is roughly the equivalent of what are your 12 year old?

Speaker 1:

I don’t know – around 11 or 12 prepubescent. And you get to go to the woods with a bunch of cute boys from other schools, but you go and stay in cabins with other girls. You aren’t allowed to like, bring your hair stuff. You get like one shower during the week, which was horrifying to me. But you, it sounds like your boy scout camp. Cause I think your boy Scouts camps had their camps at the same places that we would have outdoor school sometimes. And which I’m wondering who maintains those places, are those owners

Speaker 2:

A lot of times they’re owned by churches or like the local YMCA and WCA retreat centers. I know some outdoor schools were actually done at boy scout camps that were owned and maintained by the boy Scouts or the campfire girls or the girl Scouts or there’s a, there’s a variety of ways that they would have. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

So you basically just take all the city kids out to the woods for a week and have them camp not in tents, but again, we had cabins. Yeah. We had cabins and showers and all that good stuff. You eat in the hall with everyone and you have activities like we had challenges at the end of the week bow and arrow type stuff. But it was, it was fun. It was really fun to get out of the city for a week and hang out in the woods. And Jeremy and I have both been lucky enough to have those experiences in nature when we were young, I would really like to bring that to adults. And I was talking to my kid the other day and he’s like, “I’m really bummed I didn’t go to Boy Scouts. And we did tell him that he could still do it. But – and now you’re probably wondering why I had a 16 year old that doesn’t live with me…

Speaker 2:

It’s not her biological son, but there’s a yeah,

Speaker 1:

Totally my child. And he’s down in Portland and I love him to death, but I was like, there’s no reason we shouldn’t have nude scout camp for adults. This is such a wonderful experience for people to, to be able to, Oh my God, just get your mental health back for a minute, which takes us back to…

Speaker 2:

Yeah. So some of the thoughts that we had about nude scout is basically taking the experience that has really helped me realign my mental health. And by aligning my mental health, it’s also aligned to my physical health. So I dropped weight, not really intentionally. It’s just been part of the process of stress eating. Yes, I stopped stress eating. So when we also moved away from the city, from the convenience of the pizza place and the ice cream place,

Speaker 1:

I just learned how to make pizza. And I stayed fat…

Speaker 2:

The idea behind nude scout camp is to find ways that you want to participate in this thing that we call naturism and bring some peace and joy to your life. So I mean, I almost want to do this like a boy scout program where you have different merit badges. And some people may not be interested in ever camping when we get our property, you may not want to ever come out and camp with us, but you might want to learn how to do some Dutch oven cooking or you might want to learn about how to wrap up a sarong. I don’t know. 

Speaker 1:

We spent all last summer cooking outside over our fire, which you don’t have to live in a RV or be camping to do that. You can do it in your own backyard. And we had like no dishes. We did almost all of our cooking last summer in the cast iron pan. Sometimes over our propane heater or propane fire pit.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Oh actually I want to back up. So when I went through, after I had my railroad fatality, which was way back in 1999 I kind of had a dream at that time that I wanted to have like a retreat center for people who had gone through PTSD. And I have seen a lot of retreat centers get set up and a friend of mine just a little over a year ago, he struggled with alcoholism and he’s also a public employee. And he went to a retreat center for 30 days where they just focused on alcohol recovery. So one of the things that we we’ve talked about doing, or I’ve really thought of is having some kind of a property, a ranch, a something that looks like a cross between scout camp glamping at a dude ranch that, that people can come and hang out and enjoy events and activities that so you can…you can hang out by the water. We can go out and do some, some fun projects that gets your mind off things

Speaker 1:

Recharge with a lot of vitamin D.

Speaker 2:

Yes, which we’ve actually learned helps fight against the Corona virus. Because the Corona virus makes its way through your body by attaching to cholesterol. And if you’re out in the sun, your cholesterol converts from cholesterol to vitamin D by way of being in the UV rays. So there’s a lot of health benefits to hanging out at the dude ranch,

Speaker 1:

Which is going to come into play even more. Because back to current events, COVID is linked to risk of mental illness and brain disorders. So we’re still finding out how Corona virus mutates, how it runs throughout people’s systems. You were telling me the other day that there’s something about the longterm effects of Covid, but you had a word for it.

Speaker 2:

Long Corona.

Speaker 1:

That sounds, that sounds right. Yeah. One in eight people who get Corona virus also have their first psychiatric or neurological illness within six months. That’s scary. This just came out January 25th of this year. And it’s from the Guardian that scares the shit out of me.

Speaker 2:

The things to think about here. So we know that the Corona virus, and you’ll when you see a picture, a cartoon picture of a coronavirus virus that has these spiky things on it. And that on a molecular scale is designed to really go in and attack your system. So it gets into just the cells of your body. And somehow it is breaking that blood brain barrier and getting into the brain otherwise. Otherwise people wouldn’t be losing their sense of smell or their sense of taste because that is a function. That’s a neurological function of the brain. You’ve got the senses and the processing, again, your brain being a processing center. So when you just think about contracting the virus, and I know people who have contracted the virus and they are, they are literally scared to the point of going through a traumatic event, because this is something that kills people. And if you have been infected with something that has already killed half a million people in the United States alone and is mutating and it’s mutating, and every time the virus has passed from person to person, it increases the risk of going through another mutation. So if you think about that and if you spend any time thinking about it, I completely understand, I haven’t read the article, but I completely understand why people would be having, or be suffering from mental illness…

Speaker 1:

Well, it’s also saying that those figures rose to one in three when patients with a previous history of psychiatric or neurological illnesses were included, one in nine patients were also diagnosed with things such as depression or stroke, despite not having gone to the hospital, COVID-19.

Speaker 2:

Go back to that one in three figure, because that really, I would think of that similar to complex PTSD. So if you already have depression or if you have PTSD, you have bipolar disorder or whatever, and then you compound that with the fear of possibly dying from COVID-19 and going through that experience, that’s going to lead to some traumatic.

Speaker 1:

I just think we have no idea where this thing is going. I mean, it’s been around for a year and it’s already mutated five times now, is that correct?

Speaker 2:

Something like that. But really who knows – there could be mutations of the virus that we haven’t even discovered yet. And there was another article about, and I don’t know how accurate this actually is, but, but there are COVID sniffing dogs. Did you hear about that?

Speaker 1:

Oh, I did. I can’t remember where I read that out though.

Speaker 2:

So I don’t know exactly how, yes, scientists are training dogs to sniff out COVID-19 and they’re actually able to sniff out some of the different variants too. So there’s a guardian article. There’s also one here on CBS news. Also came out on the 25th of this month. It was a busy, busy day. Miami heat is using coronavirus sniffing dogs to screen fans at games. So

Speaker 1:

It’s amazing the things they’ll come up with when they need to make money. Huh?

Speaker 2:

Yeah. But it was really fascinating because they actually give the dogs used Corona virus laden masks, where they’ve made the virus non transmissible to animals, but they can still sniff it out. But anyway, so knowing that you may have something that is potentially deadly can really lead to some adverse mental health.

Speaker 1:

Well, I think it will also just bringing attention to, you know, how important spaces are going to be for people that are suffering or surviving through a myriad of issues, whether it’s, you know, long-term, COVID, PTSD, whatever. I mean, we’ve just seen the effect of living in the middle of a mountain that’s had on some of our neighbors and it’s, it’s been positive. But the note I would like to end on – Jeremy does these things called land acknowledgements at work. And the longer that we live and have to survive on a piece of property that’s not maintained, you know, by city and County structures, really, the more we respect the land, I mean, we’ve always respected the land, but

Speaker 2:

Not at the level at which we do now.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. And you know, living somewhere like this, you really notice the effects of climate change a lot more than you probably would in the city, even though in the city I think I’ve talked about before you may have snow, but you typically have someone like Jeremy who sends the snowplows and with the salt or whatever it is you’re using. And, you know, they try to maintain the roads as best possible, but within this we have a lot of land up here that is not ours. It is now, but it’s because it was stolen from the indigenous community. And so Jeremy does these things at work called land acknowledgements. And I wanted to talk about it because I feel like it has to do with, you know, how people experience the land. And I actually follow someone on Instagram. I think it’s @indigenoushikes. Yeah. She does a fantastic job of educating on how to recreate on indigenous land, but she’s tired. I get that. We need to do a lot better job of how we treat the land, which is part of the reason that if you are a part of the skinny diverse club, you’re part of your membership fee goes to Leave No Trace, but I don’t think Jeremy wants to read the land acknowledgement that he wrote, but I kind of,

Speaker 2:

I can, if you want me to let me set the stage a little bit though. So I probably did a bad job of that. We live in the Pacific Northwest specifically in the Puget sound area. And the Puget sound was historically a place of the indigenous people who have been here for time immemorial. And when the United States was being taken over by or the United States territory was being taken over by the people who settled in the United States and established this new form of government. There was really a process of eradicating the indigenous people and stealing the land and making it available for white people. Even the City of Seattle is named after Chief Sealth. And he was he was a leader of the indigenous people of Seattle. Today there are dozens and dozens of federally recognized tribes who stand as independent nations, sovereign nations within the United States, but not all of them are federally recognized. And if you live in the Pacific Northwest, a lot of things that we have here are named after indigenous people, the city that we live in Issaquah – is a Native American Indian word. It means “the sound of birds” 

Speaker 1:

The anglicized word for a local native American name meaning the “song of birds. Oh, it’s appropriate because we hear a lot of birds here. It’s wonderful. I was thinking about this morning, I don’t wake up to a dump truck anymore or a bus. I wake up to birds.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. So one of the people that were prominent in the Puget sound area where the people of – there’s a river named the Duwamish, but they are not a federally recognized tribe. Can you look up their website actually, as I talk? So so last week before a meeting that I had with some folks at work, it was about doing some some work around people of color, indigenous people, and women in the LGBTQ community within my own work setting, trying to advance opportunities for them. So prior to that, I wanted to give a land acknowledgement to just say, “Hey, we are performing this work body of work on land that was not ours.” If you want to know more about the Duwamish tribe, you can go to Duwamishtribe.org. They are not a federally recognized tribe, but in my opinion, they should be.

Speaker 1:

The Duwamish are a native American tribe in Western Washington and the indigenous people of metropolitan Seattle, where they have been living since the end of the glacial period. That’s a long time. 

Speaker 2:

It is, we are on their land.

So I gave a land acknowledgement and it was on the day of president Biden’s inauguration. I had written a different one previous to that, but watching the inauguration kind of moved me. So this is what I wrote for that:

 

Land acknowlegement

 

As we meet today on the land of the Duwamish People with the goal of bringing equity and a sense of belonging to the current and future employees of King County Road Services, specifically Black, Indigenous people, People of Color, Women and those who identify as LGBTQ, I want to reflect on and acknowledge the fact that we are on sacred ground.

 

Today it is my honor to give this land acknowledgement. The history of our nation is interwoven and complex with the Indigenous People in what we call the United States and specifically King County.

 

Today.

 

Specifically, today, the day that a new President was sworn in, I have hope that we will make a difference to all people of King County, but specifically to those we wish to hold up and support. In the words of President Biden, we must move forward with “Purpose and Resolve”.

 

This land acknowledgement is an important step in in helping us heal from the past and remind us to not inflict new wounds moving forward.

 

We acknowledge that we are on the traditional land of the first people of Seattle, the Duwamish People past and present and honor with gratitude the land itself and the Duwamish Tribe.

 

We respect and affirm the sovereignty of the Indian Nations.

 

So that’s how I opened my meeting a little over a week ago on the day of inauguration, when we were talking about advancing the, 

Speaker 1:

How did that go over?

Speaker 2:

It was quiet. We had about a dozen people in the, in the meeting and, and people just pause and reflected on that. I had two people that reflected to the point of tears. And then I think after we started talking about what that meant, and we spent, we only spent a couple of minutes on it, but we, but I got, got a little bit of an applause and just a moment of silence as we really reflected on the impact that we make. 

Speaker 1:

I don’t recall learning any of this in school.

Speaker 2:

You know, I think that’s one of the shortcomings in the United States school system is they don’t teach the truth about what happened during the Western expansion and the takeover of indigenous land.

Speaker 1:

Well, and I blew your mind a few weeks ago when I was reading mediocre, that fantastic book. 

Speaker 2:

You crushed me on what I thought was one of my

Speaker 1:

Oh, he will be like, so-and-so is my favorite president. I’m like, did you know, this president did this? There’s a lot of things that we weren’t taught, but one of them is it that it was FDR, right?

Speaker 2:

No, it was Teddy Roosevelt. So I admired Teddy Roosevelt for his preservation of, of land. 

Speaker 1:

He didn’t realize that all of that land was being stolen from – not just stolen, but massacring of people to do so. And yeah, you were always saying the national park service is so great. Oh, I just love that precedent. And then I’m like, do you realize how that all came about? Like they stole that and killed people? Like what always happens?

Speaker 2:

I don’t have very many white heroes anymore.

Speaker 1:

Well, let’s get some new ones. 

Speaker 2:

Yeah. I’m all for that.

All right. I think that’s it for today.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. That was a lot. That was heavy. I’m ready to go hop in a soaking tub. Yeah, that sounds good.

Speaker 2:

So if you want to know more about us, you can go to the show notes, read our blog and subscribe to this podcast by heading over to naturistpodcast.com and we’ll see you next week. Thanks for joining us.

Speaker 1:

If you’d like to help the Global Naturist Alliance you can do so by taking a screenshot of this podcast, posting it on your social media and tagging us. And also thank you to the people that have done that it’s really helped our podcast travel and a five-star reviews are always appreciated.

Speaker 2:

I just want to say hi and thanks to all the friends I’ve met in this naturist community, especially those of you who have really gotten to know me and talk through,

Speaker 1:

Oh, you’ve never had friends. And you were so upset for so long because you didn’t have friends. And I, I understand why you’re crying right now. This has been incredibly meaningful to you

Speaker 2:

Doing this really means a lot to me. And and I appreciate all of you.

Speaker 1:

Okay. Maybe you’ll come and hang out at our dude ranch. I can’t talk anymore. Okay. Bye guys. Bye.